What style do you prefer?

ePIC

Well-known member
I think it's easiest to shoot a documentary that's done through an interview style. One where I ask the questions or set the scenes. I prefer to watch, the more natural style though. One where whatever happens, happens. What about you?
 

Marc

Member
I prefer to just shoot things naturally and let it go however it goes. I think my footage seems more authentic that way; however, there's no denying that I have a TON of footage that is essentially unusable, and it's not an efficient way to gather footage by any means.
 

Portrait

Well-known member
I think it's easiest to shoot a documentary that's done through an interview style. One where I ask the questions or set the scenes. I prefer to watch, the more natural style though. One where whatever happens, happens. What about you?
Different documentary types require varying techniques from the cinematographer. The interview technique is popular with participatory documentaries that involve interaction between the filmmakers and their subject(s). They are usually interactive and focus on direct engagement.
 

Rachel

Well-known member
Some couples want a documentary video for their wedding (seriously!) and I usually mix it up. Some of what I video is candid and some of it is more like conducting an interview.
 

SamanthaL.

Well-known member
@Rachel, I would totally take their money too, but I can't imagine being the couple and believing people cared about my wedding enough to warrant all that. I guess all wedding videos are a form of documentary, but I would feel silly asking my nearest and dearest to sit for interviews.
 

ClickExpert

Well-known member
I prefer to just shoot things naturally and let it go however it goes. I think my footage seems more authentic that way; however, there's no denying that I have a TON of footage that is essentially unusable, and it's not an efficient way to gather footage by any means.
Yes, the best approach is to shoot the documentary naturally then, later on, edit out the unnecessary sections. Like @Portrait mentions, the method used will depend on the type of documentary in question.
 

Madhatter

Active member
It depends on what kind of documentary you produce and what you want to present to the audience I guess? I like documentary in which it’s not only the narration that matters, but also how the environment and everything is captured. I don’t know how to call it. It’s like that kind of ethnographic observation when you conduct research. It’s the feeling produced and perceived by the audience that ultimately matters in my opinion.
 

ClickExpert

Well-known member
It depends on what kind of documentary you produce and what you want to present to the audience I guess? I like documentary in which it’s not only the narration that matters, but also how the environment and everything is captured. I don’t know how to call it. It’s like that kind of ethnographic observation when you conduct research. It’s the feeling produced and perceived by the audience that ultimately matters in my opinion.
I agree that it depends on how and what the documentary aims to communicate. Are you referring to poetic documentaries? Usually, they focus on depicting issues to the audience through images, experiences, and a different set of eyes.
 

EyeView

Well-known member
Since we're talking about Documentary, I'd prefer the natural style since it would really give light to situations that occur behind the camera. Although it would be helpful to add interviews too when adding more information and insight as long as it doesn't produce biases.
 

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