Red Flags When Shopping For A Camera

Markshot 12

Well-known member
I thought it might be a good idea to start this section off with a conversation about counterfeit equipment.

So can you think of any red flags that could pop up during your search when buying a camera?

One would be that if the price is too good to be true, it probably is. If it's used, still get comparables.
 

Rachel

Well-known member
Good topic idea! Check for the serial number. Most videography gear will have one. Sometimes you can even google the number to see if it has been stolen. I won't buy used gear if they don't allow for returns. That's not necessarily a red flag, but it's something I'm not willing to risk.
 

Mobile 5

Well-known member
I don't know if this qualifies as a red flag or not, but the more expensive the equipment is that you want to buy, the more legitimate the seller should be. Someone selling cameras on a 2 month old website isn't somewhere you should go to buy $1,000 worth of Nikon.
 

ePIC

Well-known member
I've gotten burned before. I bought a Cannon on Amazon and Amazon was listed as the seller. I thought that lent some credibility to it. It turned out to be a fake though. What gave it away was the battery. It obviously wasn't an official battery as the units of measurement were that of another country and it was in another language to boot. So definitely check out the battery during your return window. Amazon refunded me and gave me a store credit once I brought it to their attention. They also pulled the listing. Some fakes are just that good.
 

Paul Stevens

Well-known member
I check for a warranty because most new videography gear will come with some sort of warranty. It's usually a leaflet that's tucked inside the box that encourages you to go online and register your product. I used to only care about the cords, the batteries, and the manual, but now I search for the leaflet first.
 

Mobile 5

Well-known member
I bought a Cannon on Amazon and Amazon was listed as the seller.
I never really understood that concept because I always bought from "stores". Third party sellers. If I can find a camera or anything else that comes from a small yet established and trusted seller, I'll always go with them. In this case, it reminds me the of mom and pop stores where everyone knows who they're dealing with.

They have to have credibility though.
 

ePIC

Well-known member
I never really understood that concept because I always bought from "stores". Third party sellers. If I can find a camera or anything else that comes from a small yet established and trusted seller, I'll always go with them . . .

They have to have credibility though.

Because that was the ongoing advice at the time in order to protect yourself from unwittingly buying fake electronics, handbags, sneakers, and other things of value that are often counterfeited. It makes sense. A third-party seller can close up shop overnight and open another one in no time. Reviews can be bought and sold for pennies and Amazon is slow at removing the ones that get reported. It's easy to bury the negative reviews and how many customers look beyond the star rating anyway? Buyers generally pay attention to the seller's reviews on Ebay because it was the first of its kind and it trained its users to pay attention to those reviews in order to protect themselves. Amazon's platform muddies the waters. You really have to look to see who you are buying from. Couple that with FBA and it's easy to see why buying from the company itself should be safer. But Amazon actually got caught with tons of fakes! They didn't do it on purpose I'm sure, but loads of counterfeit goods snuck through their supply chain and quality control departments. As such, several high-end brands won't allow their goods to be listed on Amazon (Amazon agreed to it during a lawsuit settlement or something). So really, no one has credibility when it comes to counterfeit goods. You can protect yourself as much as possible by hitting up stores that have been around for a while and have a solid reputation, but you still need to consider all those other red-flags that have been mentioned in this thread too.
 

SamanthaL.

Well-known member
I won't buy from sellers who refuse to take a credit card. They might have legitimate reasons to prefer other sources of payment, but paying with a credit card gives consumers more protections.

I remember when that was in the news, @ePIC. It was shocking!
 

Markshot 12

Well-known member
So really, no one has credibility when it comes to counterfeit goods.

That part of your answer made me think of brand loyalists. Some people care more about the equipment itself and will use different brand name parts in the same unit to get their desired results. For those people, authenticity in brand takes a back seat to quality. They don't care if it's counterfeit or not. Does it work?
 

Flair

Member
I would be very careful if you are considering buying equipment on ebay. I have found that if goods are tracked and do not arrive, then the system ebay has in place works well. But if it is a case of faulty goods, it is possible you may run into difficulties.
Also, try not to pay through bank transfer or internet banking, but use paypal if possible.
I always prefer to buy from a retail outlet, usually one that lets you try out your purchase first, especially if buying cameras or equipment.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
956
Messages
4,289
Members
101
Latest member
Pippercc
Top